Latest Story

October 1, 2019

https://www.cascadeclinic.ca/locums-recruitment

We are actively seeking locums who are a part of the Rural GP Locum Program for clinic and ER vacation coverage. We are an “A” community under the RGPLP and each ER shift is eligible for REEF and MOCAP as rural incentives. A billing clerk is available during a locum assignment as well as the use of locum housing.

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To show our appreciation for locums, members of our community have put together a Love a Locum” campaign to give visiting locums a warm welcome and celebrate their role in ensuring sustainable healthcare in Princeton. A gift basket with local gift certificates, healthy fruits and home baked goods provided by members of the community is presented to the locum on their first day of clinic.

To learn more about locum opportunities available here at Cascade Medical Centre you can call the clinic at 250.295.4482 or check the Locums for Rural BC website to see when we have locum assignments available.

The town of Princeton is nestled at the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and is the Southern Gateway to BC’s interior. A small town rich in history and beauty with four seasons of activities and opportunity for adventure at every turn!

We are currently staffed with five GP’s and 1 Nurse Practitioner as well as a full complement of medical office assistants. Our clinic offers a wide range of primary care services and is supported by an updated EMR (MedAccess). Cascade Medical Centre is conveniently attached to the hospital, which is a 6 bed inpatient hospital with a 24 hour emergency room and attached long term care facility.

At this time, we are not recruiting for another physician.

Video courtesy of SimilkameenValley.com

Check out Similkameen Valley’s Road trip video above to see why physicians are choosing Princeton as the place they
come to work and play!

SOS Primary Care Network Report – Vulnerabilities and Solutions –

September 21, 2019

September 2019
South Okanagan Similkameen Primary Care Network
The first five months of Primary Care Network funding have been full of great progress, allowing our region to address vulnerabilities and to strengthen our existing network of care, as we continue our shift towards team-based primary care delivery.

Vulnerabilities and Solutions
For context we have highlighted each of our networks of care, their vulnerabilities, and solutions to address those vulnerabilities. Some of these solutions pre-date Primary Care Network funding, some are being shored up by Primary Care Network funding, while still others are being introduced as a result of Primary Care Network funding.

We have also highlighted some process issues and proposed solutions in order to increase the success of Primary Care Network implementation, which began in Penticton, Summerland and Okanagan Falls, with service plan deveopment underway with the communities of Oliver, Osoyoos, Osoyoos Indian Band, Keremeos, Lower Similkameen Indian Band, Upper Similkameen Indian Band, Hedley and Princeton.

To access the report, click on the link  #1 SOS PCN report – Sept 2019

South Okanagan Similkameen Primary Care Network Issues Paper 

September 21, 2019

The South Okanagan Similkameen (SOS) Primary Care Network (PCN) encompasses the entire SOS region. It serves approximately 90,000 residents in 8 communities.
The following paper contains an environmental scan of issues that have surfaced in our region. Input was given by physicians, Nurse Practitioners, Interior Health, indigenous partners, local government, and patient voices. 
Similar concerns were echoed by other Wave 1 communities.

  • There has been no interest in GP contracts.
  • Expectations around NPs overheads shifted after our funding was approved, without consultation or additional funds..
  • Allied Health professional (AH) and Registered Nurse (RN) and Pharmacist overhead is not adequate to cover overhead costs.
  • In our experience, NPs need support to transition into full-service family practice.
  • Data infra structure is not being co-designed with local PCNs.
  • At steady state, access to 11 sources of data is required for PCN reporting.
    There is an overall lack of a standardized approach in operationalizing data infra structure PCNs from various sources.
    Read more »

Summary on the Health Sciences Association Conference – April 2018

August 27, 2019

Ed Staples

Summary on the Health Sciences Association Conference – April 2018

Edward Staples
President of SOHC (Support Our Health Care) and
BC Rural Health Network Lead.

Vancouver Hyatt Regency April 13, 2018

Achieving High-Performing Primary and Community Care: the Critical Role of Health Science Professions

The conference opened with a welcome from Val Avery, Health Sciences Association (HSA) President and a First Nations Welcome from Coast Salish Elder Roberta Price.

The keynote speaker was the Honourable Judy Darcy, BC Minister of Mental Health and Addictions. She gave a brief overview of her first 9 months in office and made the following points:

Judy Darcy

• collaboration and team building on the “front lines” is critically important to address the opioid crisis

• addressing the crisis will require “all hands on deck”

• the focus of the Ministry is on child and youth prevention, First Nations, and the high rate of death associated with substance use

▪ most people who die from opioid overdose die alone

▪ 3 out of 4 are male between the age of 30 and 59

▪ 1 in 10 are indigenous

• problems with the current system:

• “no coordination of services”

• gaps in the service – fragmentation  lack of a team approach

• the goal is to develop an “ask once” system that will take you where you need to go

• addressing the problem by building a better system; funding for:

• training

• naloxone dispersal

• establishing overdose prevention sites

• establishing designated teams in each Health Authority

• recognizing that parents are often the “first responders”

• province wide coverage by “robust, interdisciplinary teams”

• addressing the social determinants of health

• making connections

Minister Darcy closed her remarks by recognizing the valuable work being done by the HSA and asked for advice and direction from HSA members on how to “close the gaps”. Read more »

How these Canadians got hooked on opioids

August 20, 2019

This is the first story in a four-part series about the pharmaceutical industry and the hold it has on Canada’s health-care system — swaying doctors’ opinions, funding medical schools and, ultimately, affecting the type of drugs we are prescribed.

Steve Angst’s 11-year opioid addiction started with a workplace injury.

Angst was working at a Cami Automotive assembly plant in Ontario when he injured his right shoulder in 1991. The 56-year-old, then 28, needed reconstructive surgery.

After working on his shoulder, doctors prescribed Demerol to help with the pain. A few years later, in 1993, Angst needed more surgery to repair damage resulting from a fall. Then in 1996, he needed another operation on his left shoulder.

He went to his doctor for the pain — working at the plant required repetitive motion — and was prescribed Percocet. From there, his troubles with opioids got out of control.

“I got to the point where I couldn’t do anything unless I took a Percocet,” he said.

“And then, of course, the Percocet didn’t work anymore, so I go to the doctor and they just prescribe more Percocet.”

Read more at https://globalnews.ca/news/5664978/opioid-addiction-from-prescriptions/

 

Health policy expert testifies in defence of public health care in Cambie case

July 11, 2019

The BC Health Coalition is an intervenor in the Dr. Brian Day and Cambie Surgeries court case. Following is a recap of what they have been up to, both inside and outside the courtroom.

SOHC is a member of the BCHC and we are following this case closely.

 

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1. Health policy expert testifies in defence of public health care in Cambie case

Public health expert Dr. David Himmelstein, M.D. took the stand in the Cambie case to offer a comparative analysis of the US and Canadian health care systems.  Dr. Himmelstein, the second expert witness brought by our intervenor group, is a well-respected health policy professor at City University of New York School of Public Health and lecturer in medicine at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Himmelstein has studied the impacts of for-profit healthcare and private insurance in the U.S. for decades.

Dr. Himmelstein’s evidence went to the heart of Cambie Surgeries’ central claims, and refuted the deceptions relied on by Cambie in an attempt to prove their case. He  testified to the overall societal costs to health care if Cambie Surgeries’ legal attack against the public health care system were to be successful. Dr. Himmelstein gave evidence on the dangers of introducing private insurance into single-payer health care systems such as Canada’s, and the risks of allowing for-profit healthcare organizations to operate.

2. BC Health Coalition experts debunk myth that private clinics and for-profit health care decrease wait times Read more »

Study in the South Okanagan Similkameen

June 24, 2019
We need your help with a study that collects information on the health and well-being needs of men in the South Okanagan Similkameen. The Principal Investigator is Nelly Oelke, Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, UBCO.
 
Your views will be used to build a picture of men’s health needs and can help to improve services for men in your community.
 
There will be a one hour interview in a confidential space in your community by phone.
You will receive a $25 honorarium for your time.
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BECOME A MEMBER

To become a member of SOHC, please
email the secretary.
Annual membership is $2.
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SOHC Discussion Paper

Developing an Improved and Sustainable Health Care Model for Princeton, B.C
Support Our Health Care has released a discussion paper in order to get feedback from the community, politicians and professionals about the state of local healthcare and what the long term solutions should be.
Download PDF Here