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Newsletter # 7 – December 2017

January 2, 2018

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Support Our Health Care has had a very active year. To read the latest SOHC Newsletter, click on the following:

pdf SOHC December 2017 Newsletter

Better stay healthy because doctor supply in B.C. is about to get a whole lot worse

December 18, 2017

Patients having trouble finding doctors haven’t seen anything yet, suggests a study by B.C. researchers

PAMELA FAYERMAN

Published on: December 10, 2017 | Last Updated: December 11, 2017 4:32 PM PST

Doctor

Patients having trouble finding doctors — or waiting too long to see specialists and get treatment — haven’t seen anything yet, suggests a study by B.C. researchers that was published Monday.

That’s because about 40 per cent of B.C. doctors are at — or near — the average age that doctors retire, 65.1. And to exacerbate things, the study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal shows that 40 per cent of doctors reduce their workload at least 10 per cent in the three years before they retire.

The problem is particularly acute for patients preferring female doctors or living in rural areas. Female physicians tend to retire four years before male doctors, and on average, rural doctors retire just over two years earlier.

It is hypothesized that rural doctors may retire earlier because of burnout or because of lower cost of living but regardless, “early retirement in these communities is of particular concern, given that many rural areas are known to have substantial difficulties recruiting and retaining physicians,” says the team of authors from the University of B.C., Simon Fraser University and the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute.

Lindsay Hedden, lead author and UBC researcher, said governments rely on College of Physicians and Surgeons licensing “head counts” but that may not be the most accurate method of counting doctors because many keep their licences active even when they wind down their practices. “Our findings (based on billing data) indicate that current forecasts likely overestimate the supply of physicians that will be practising in the future and the amount of service they will provide.”
Read more »

News Release – Princeton Health Care Steering Committee

December 11, 2017

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November 24, 2017
submitted by Edward Staples

Report on the November meeting of the Princeton Health Care Steering Committee
On Tuesday, November 21, the Princeton Health Care Steering Committee (PHCSC) held its monthly meeting at Princeton General Hospital. The PHCSC was formed in 2013 to provide a mechanism for Interior Health, the Town of Princeton, the Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen, Cascade Clinic, Princeton General Hospital, and community organizations to work together to support stable, sustainable and accessible health care in Princeton.

This month’s meeting was attended by representatives from the Town of Princeton, Area H (RDOS), Cascade Medical practitioners, Princeton General Hospital staff, Interior Health, BC Ambulance Services, Princeton and District Community Services, Princeton Family Services, RCMP, and Support Our Health Care (SOHC). The meeting was chaired by Interior Health administrator, Susan Brown.

Susan Brown welcomed Sandra Lawlor (Area H), Connie Howe (Princeton Community Services), Heather Eriksen (Princeton Family Services), and Corporal Chad Parsons (RCMP) as new members on the Steering Committee.

Mary Beth Rutherford from the Penticton office of the BC Alzheimer’s Society gave a presentation outlining First Link, a referral program designed to help newly diagnosed people with dementia get the help they need as soon as possible. First Link assists physicians and health and community service providers to connect people living with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias and their families with the Alzheimer Society.

Suzanne Moccia, South Okanagan Similkameen Division of Family Practice, presented information on the Patient Medical Home, a primary health care model that focuses on team based, patient-centred care. Cascade Medical practitioners, Dr Black, Dr Monro and NP Ter Keurs, heartily endorsed the model and reported that they are working with the Division to implement the PMH model in Princeton.

Cherie Whittaker reported on facility upgrades at Princeton General Hospital. New purchases include the purchase of cardiac monitoring equipment and a new ventilator. The cardiac monitoring equipment connects our hospital with a network allowing consultation in real time between the GP and a cardiac specialist. The ventilator supports respiratory care in the Emergency Department. Whittaker also reported that three new Licensed Practical Nurses have been hired at the hospital.
Read more »

Clubhouse for addiction, mental health opening in March

November 30, 2017

Princeton Family Centre

The former Princeton Fire Hall, on Veterans’ Way, has had many uses over the years. The town is donating part of the building’s space to the Anchorage Program.

ANDREA DEMEERNov. 30, 2017 9:30 a.m.NEWS
Princeton has been without a drop in centre for nearly two years

A clubhouse to serve people with mental illness and addiction will reopen in downtown Princeton after more than two years.
“I am so happy that this is getting going,” said town councillor Rosemary Doughty, who worked on the committee charged with replacing the clubhouse.
“It’s taken a long time and it’s coming together really well. They [clients] can bring their club together again where they have a place of belonging. The Anchorage users have been important parts of our community for years.”

The Anchorage Program – which served about 25 people – lost its drop in center in January 2015 when the building it occupied was sold.
It will be up and running again in March 2018, according to Kevin Fraser, manager of mental health and addiction services for Interior Health.

The Anchorage will have a new location, as well as a new operations model.
The new Anchorage clubhouse will be founded adjacent to the drop in center’s former location, on Veteran’s Way. It is the former Princeton Fire Hall, and has also been used as a teen drop in center and an office for Princeton Family Services.
That building – part of which is also used by the Princeton Gun Club as a shooting range – is being made available at no cost by the town, said Fraser.
“The municipality has been very kind in their offering,” he said.
Read more »

Panel discussion – BC Health Coalition Conference 2017

November 3, 2017

BCHC Friday 100_preview-Colleen Fuller

From left to right: Marcy Cohen – moderator (health and social policy researcher), Colleen Fuller (health policy analyst,Board of Directors of REACH Community Health Centre in Vancouver), Edward Staples (President of SOHC (Support Our Health Care), member of the BCHC Steering Committee, member of the Princeton Health Care Steeringng Committee, and the South Okanagan Similkameen Community Healthcare Coalition), Dr. Margaret McGregor (Family Physician, Director of the UBC Dep. of Family Practice, Community Geriatrics, a research assciate with the VCHRI’s centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Evaluation and the UBC Centre for Health Services and Policy), Anita Shen (student of nursing and a former youth in government care), Kerrie Watt (Youth Mental Health & Substance Use Prevention Educator with Vancouver Coastal Health)

Questions to Ed Staples, President of SOHC, are in Italic
1. Can you describe the role of the community in advocating for and working with local health professionals to address the gaps/challenges in health services in your and other rural communities, and can you explain why and how primary care reform is seen as key in addressing these problems?

To address the first part, the role of the community, quite simply, is to identify what’s needed and to establish a collaborative and cooperative relationship with all community stakeholders to make change happen.

It is critically important for there to be a “community” voice.  Otherwise, the professionals – the doctors, administrators, and bureaucrats – will view the world as the aggregate of their specific, unique patients, and the formal funding and legal structures surrounding them – mostly government and especially provincial government supported and directed. Read more »

BC Health Coalition 2017 Conference

October 20, 2017

We’re only two weeks away from the BC Health Coalition 2017 Conference, an exciting two full days of speakers, and workshops. Discussions and topics include seniors care, primary health care, Indigenous health, health organizing, poverty reduction, pharmacare and others. This is a unique opportunity to learn together, strategize and take action to strengthen our public health care system in B.C. Click here to register.

Dates: Friday, October 27th to Saturday, October 28th, 2017
Times: 11 am to 4:30 pm on Friday, 8:30 am to 3:30 pm on Saturday
Location: Jewish Community Centre,  950 41st Ave W, Vancouver, BC V5Z 2N7
Cost: $0-$75 sliding scale. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds.

The Conference Is An Opportunity To…
• Hear from Jenny Morgan, BC Women’s and Children’s Hospitals, and Elder Roberta Price, First Nations educator, speak about empowering Indigenous women and families in health services and healing.
Read more »

Quiet Moments

September 22, 2017

Version 2

A resident in our long term care facility likes to eat his lunch in the hallway of the hospital where he can look at a mural. Edward Staples, President of SOHC, made the ceramic tile mural and donated it to the hospital. The mural, entitled Emerge, depicts an iconic and very familiar place in Princeton.

BECOME A MEMBER

To become a member of SOHC, please
email the secretary.
Annual membership is $2.
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SOHC Discussion Paper

Developing an Improved and Sustainable Health Care Model for Princeton, B.C
Support Our Health Care has released a discussion paper in order to get feedback from the community, politicians and professionals about the state of local healthcare and what the long term solutions should be.
Download PDF Here